Potential Jobs in the Marijuana Industry

Legalizing marijuana nationwide could generate more than $130 billion in federal tax revenue and add 1 million jobs in the next decade.

The cannabis business has been growing at an exponential rate over the last several years, thanks to the voting public. Propositions regarding the use of both medical and recreational marijuana are passing in state after state. Along with the legalization of marijuana comes the need for a mechanism to dispense it on a wider, legitimate scale so naturally, jobs have sprouted up in the industry.

Similar to other occupations, you can snag a job in the marijuana business through connections and career websites. If your preference is to bypass working for others, and you’re looking to get in on the ground floor to establish your own cannabis business, there are resources like 420 College to help you navigate the laws and tax implications that impact business owners in this growing field. Legalizing marijuana nationwide could generate more than $130 billion in federal tax revenue and add 1 million jobs in the next decade, according to a new study.

But then, what qualifications do you need to just get your foot in the door? What exactly is in store for someone interested in working with cannabis?

Edible Chef

It might be hard to imagine that people with a knack for churning out delicious food can carve out a niche in this field, but there’s an essential role for chefs. Edible makers have devised ways to eradicate the taste of cannabis in their treats and concoct some tasty baked goods. If you’re experienced in the kitchen and preferably have a degree in the culinary arts, cooking edibles along with pioneering new recipes could be in your wheelhouse.

Budtender

Just like the title implies, a budtender is similar to a bartender, but with varieties of marijuana as the product. Budtenders guide clients to the right cannabis based on what effect they are trying to achieve. As with any position that regularly interacts with patrons, the job requires personality and charisma, along with experience in sales and customer service.

Cashier

Cashiers also need to demonstrate excellent customer service skills. While they won’t need to be as familiar with the individual products as the budtenders, they should have a basic knowledge of the overall operation. Cashiers are typically the first and most approachable face that customers notice when they enter the store, so it’s crucial for them to know how to respond to inquiries. Ultimately, this position is responsible for financial transactions.

Marijuana Courier

Another key job is cannabis delivery. Their role is to bring the marijuana to customers who need it, but are unable to go out for it. Many establishments pay couriers on commission, which also have the potential for receiving tips. The mode of transportation is up to the courier, whether it’s a bicycle or car. Regardless, you’ll need to have a valid driver’s license, a clean driving record, and clear criminal history.

Trimmer

One of the more entry-level jobs is weed-trimming, which entails workers cutting up the bud to be more presentable and visually appealing. Following this path is easier in states that have legalized recreational marijuana, while other states require additional licenses related to handling marijuana plants. This is an excellent fit for those who are interested in gardening and outdoorsy work.

Dispensary Manager

This is definitely one of the more difficult, but rewarding positions to attain. With dispensaries still a somewhat rare commodity, managers need to ensure their stores are on their A-game, and that they hire highly experienced people with retail or pharmaceutical backgrounds. Like any leader, you should be well-versed in managing people while operating a retail establishment.

Although these roles sound relatively generic, the nature of dispensaries and the product are added nuances that traditional businesses don’t have to take into account. Dispensaries are still relatively new in the marketplace as the industry continues to evolve, so there’s always the potential for the field to expand.

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